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CSPAN
May 3, 2014 6:00am EDT
situation in ukraine and the future of relations between the u.s. and germany. this is 30 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. it is always a great pleasure to welcome my friend chancellor merkel to the white house. germany is one of our strongest allies and angela is one of my closest partners. with her indulgence, i want to start by making two brief comments. first, as president, my top priority is doing everything we can to create more jobs and opportunity for hard-working families for our economic strength as a source of strength in the world. this morning, we learned our businesses created 277,000 new jobs last month. all told, our business is now created 9.2 million new jobs over 50 consecutive months of job growth. the grit and determination of the american people are moving us forward but we have to keep a relentless focus on job creation and creating more opportunities for work and families. there is plenty more that congress should be doing from raising the minimum wage to creating good construction jobs and rebuilding america. i want to work with them wherever i can but i keep a
CSPAN
May 3, 2014 4:00am EDT
thought it was no longer really necessary. we used to say germany was surrounded by friends and everything is wonderful. obviously we need to take a fresh look because o'land is our immediate neighbor, part of our club, our union, and pole -- pollland has a bored irwith ukraine and if there's chaos in ukraine and beyond it affects our very own security and that of all of nate at the and the i as well. so, yes, i think there must be a comprehensive review of our priorities, both in the e.u. and in nato, but let's not do it, if i may say so with foaming at the mouth. let's do it cool, and let's do it also, always, in -- with having in mind consistency. >> on that thought we're going to questions from the audience. if you just briefly give your name and affiliation. you know the rule, a question, not a statement. >> thank you. from george washington university. we talked about in april of 2008 the nato summit decided to not extend membership action to ukraine and georgia, and within four months georgia was invaded. with hindsight, the word wisdom has been subpoena number of times t
CSPAN
May 3, 2014 2:00am EDT
principle that europe, germany, and united states could not wish for a more reliable partner respectively than we have in the transatlantic alliance. the alliance is a prime importance to all of us and this is the basis for our very close economic cooperation as well. the transatlantic economic the whole 15ure on million jobs on that side of the atlantic. it is indispensable. german companies alone a great in more than 600,000 jobs over haveand american companies created 800,000 jobs as of now. the u.s. chamber of commerce is an eloquent testament to these very close integrations of our tool economic areas. the world has changed incredibly. you have more of a political and theomic weight of economies, the overall framework of the g 20. the global financial and economic crisis as greatly impaired progress and growth in the countries which has a lasting impact. globally, we see a tightening of growth which is something we are very pleased to. of imf is excepting growth 3.6% and next year to 3.9%. reason for usbe a to be complacent. in europe and the united states, just as other
CSPAN
May 3, 2014 2:00am EDT
repeatedly. we were promised that after germany's unification than it would not spread eastward. a started expanding and incorporating former warsaw treaty countries. we heard in response this does not concern you. nations and countries have the war to choose the way of ensuring the security. that's true, but it's also true when the infrastructure of the military bloc approaches our borders we have grounds for apprehension question. no one could deny as this right. he went on to say have been no and western leaders have long many times tsongas, made decisions behind the back of price wars and accomplished fact some today we want to examine whether in natal and the newly expanded nato alliance is now reaping the whirlwind of that decision and the ukraine. the of a very distinguished panel of people here today who are essentially present at the creation in one way or another. you will have biographies, but briefly the former foreign minister and actually first prime minister and then foreign minister of poland, going to make the your first name. on my immediate left, prime minister of poland
CSPAN
May 3, 2014 12:00am EDT
germany. we will not succeed if we are doing that on our own. but i have pledged to chancellor merkel has been, in addition to the reforms we have already taken, in addition to saying we are going to apply privacy standards to how we deal with non-us persons as well as u.s. persons, in addition to the work we are doing to constrain the potential use of bulk data -- we are committed to a u.s.-german cyber dialogue to close further the gaps that may exist in terms of how we operate and how german intelligence operates to make sure there is transparency and clarity about we are doing and what our goals and intentions are. these are complicated issues and we are not perfectly aligned yet but we share the same values and we share the same concerns. this is something that is deeply important to me. i am absolutely committed by the time i leave this office, we will have a stronger legal footing and international framework for how we are doing business in the intelligence sphere. i will say that i don't think there is an inevitable contradiction between our security and safety in our privacy.
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 10:00pm EDT
for the update. angela merkel talks about u.s. relations with germany and the transatlantic trade and investment partnership. this is an hour. >> please welcome dr. angela merkel. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the chamber of commerce of the united states. period is tom donohue am the president and ceo of the spine institution. i would like to extend a special welcome to those of you visiting our headquarters for the first time. the chamber is a 102-year-old organization. this building serves as a central rallying point for the ..s. business community we host several hundred meetings here in this room alone every year. room we are gathered in today, the international hall of flags, is rich in symbolism and history. afterom takes its name the overhead banners of 12 great explorers who blazed the first paths of trade. they planted the first seeds of commercial and industrial growth in the new world. these flags remind us that the transatlantic relationship has been around for a long time. today, we are reminded just how essential this relationship is. alliance is.-eu cri
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 6:00pm EDT
. can you believe it happened in germany with hitler? an ableonsidered manager. that is basically what happened. that is basically the root of the problem today with the theine that is part of russian establishment. do you know what happened? 1994, russian elite, the ruling class, those who benefited the most and privatized the results of the --ocratic revolution of 1991 i haven't seen any of those in the so-called white house in augustthe coup 1991. they were quick to privatize the and gasw from the oil experts, which is still the basic economy. amazing the russian onte today is mostly based -- that is the answer to the question. russian elite to enable, theleft russia to post-soviet propaganda that is what it is today. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> it is very painful for me to say these things. nd disappointed but did you think this would be a back door way? this would morph into an to nato pathway membership even though at the time it was painted in a different fashion? >> i will be frank. at this moment, we are very disappointed. the -- fourhat was nato membership, for the firs
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 4:00pm EDT
wilson center they hosted a discussion on ukraine with former diplomats from germany, russia, and poland. they also heard today from chuck hagel. margaret warner moderated the discussion. . harmon and secretary hagel iterated this morning, i would remind you we are here to look at really 20 years ago at this fateful decision was taken in january of 1994 which was at it to offer a partnership for peace to russia, warsaw pactwer states. any on this panel i will at thece in this panel, time, the czech republic and hungary were clamoring for an nato membership. this was a compromise suggested by the administration. beginning in 1997, nato started thosembership first to three countries, and today it is 12 countries among larger than it was, the 16 members at the time. this obviously sticks in president putin's craw. in his telethon, i do not know how many of you watched this, he talked about it repeatedly. he said we were promised after germany's unification, nato would not spread eastward. when we said why are you doing this, we hurt in response this does not concern you. nations and countri
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 2:00pm EDT
sanctions against iran and it is no surprise that they are opposing sanctions against russia. germany ruthlessly pursued its mercantile interest and the lobbyist wrong. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including the former german chancellor. he is making money helping national gas -- natural gas flow. >> which goes to one of the fundamental flaws of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool, correct? >> it is a rather blunt instrument. choice than tono try sanctions. politics are a flaw. ismany is what russia -- rubbish' partner. partner.ading what jacktell you lew had to say. >> if you look at the impact on russia's economy it is misleading to look at what happens day by day. you have to look over the time crimeaussia went into since we have imposed sanctions. there has been a substantial in russia'sn and -- weak economy. we see it in their exchange rate and stock exchange and a number of important economic indicators. they were downgraded to one notch above junk and with the rationale and the bond rating was in part the sanctions being imposed. the ques
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 12:00pm EDT
instance, to eastern germany. we could not find it, maybe somebody find it, but we have no record. we had no records of that. but gorbachev apparently seems to believe still today that he had such a promise. and president yeltsin believed that he had a promise, and they detail how he was led to believe that, that partnership for peace was with instead of nato in -- [inaudible] not the first step, not a preparative step which i knew because delbert and then christopher and my western european colleagues spent time to explain that to me. while they failed to tell that to president putin -- to president yeltsin at that time. so that brings me back to my point. it's not enough for the to be on the right side of history. it's important. but they should speak in clear terms. that's what russians deserve. that's what putin deserves. that's what russian parliament deserves. that's what ukrainian people in particular today because they are suffering in the war actually. so they deserve very, very clear message. and the message which meets the end. because somebody whispered something to so
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 12:00pm EDT
quote when partnering with friends like germany. we will not succeed if we are
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 10:00am EDT
repeatedly saying we were promised after germany's unification nato wouldn't expand eastward but they started expanding and taking warsaw treaty countries. when we said why are you doing this we heard this doesn't concern you nations and countries have the right to chose their own security. and he said that is true. but whether the infrastructure of military blocks or approaches our borders we must take concern steps and no one can deny this. he said nato and leaders lied many times and placed before him an accomplished fact and that is what happened with nato expansion. tonight we want to examine whether nato and the expanded nato alliance is reaping the worldwind of the decision in ukraine. we have a panel here of people who were present at the creation in one way or another. the former minister and then -- or first prime minister and then former minister of poland here and i will butcher your name. he was the prim minister in '87 when they were first invited to join. next is the foreign minister at the waning base of the soviet union and 1991-1996 of russia and was involved in this
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 10:00am EDT
sanctions against russia clear in recent weeks. as a result, germany's position is unlikely to shift, barring a dramatic escalation of the conflict in ukraine. we will hear from chancellor merkel and president obama. in the meantime, a washington journal discussion this morning on the effectiveness of sanctions. host: our friday roundtable focusing on the issue of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool, do they work? carla anne robbins is a senior fellow at the council on foreign relations. mark dubowitz of the foundation for democracy. "the wall street journal" the president meets with angela merkel. german companies opposing sanctions, can you explain. guest: german companies opposed sanctions against iran, it is no surprise they are opposing sanctions against russia. the german corporate lobby is very strong. it is no surprise. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including former german chancellor, who is making a lot of money helping natural gas flow from russia to germany. no surprise. angela merkel is under pressure. host: one of the fundamental fl
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 6:00am EDT
exports gas into the eu the first country of transit let's say germany or ukraine or other eu countries, could not say, they couldn't dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do the minute the gas comes into the eu it is not eu gas and to be transferred for the. as we talked before about reversing the clothes from poland hungary to slovakia into ukraine that would not impossible in 2009 because of the regular structure that was in place. by working with europe to get the regulatory structure their making some investments, getting them to make investments in infrastructure their less reliant today. but as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe there's more we can do together to make sure that reliance is diminished, and quite significantly. >> is a pipe dream for americans to see themselves in anything like the near future providing natural gas to europe and with that have any effect on our domestic market? or do we have so much that it would simply mean a new market and a new perhaps reduction in the trade imba
CSPAN
May 2, 2014 1:00am EDT
? >> at home until i was recalled. >> the operations center in germany. you were in the room. >> yes. >> you were able to see, hear, feel, understand what was going on in that room? >> we worked toward understanding, yes, sir. >> were you ever interviewed by the accountability review board? >> no, sir. >> your primary responsibility was to try -- "j two was focused on attribution, that attacks became a german will very soon after the event." what do you believe they were attributable to? >> an islamist extremist group. >> al qaeda? >> we felt it was ansaria. >> affiliated with al qaeda. >> yes. >> aqim, were they involved? >> aas is who we looked at. >> how quickly did you come to the conclusion that you believed there were al qaeda affiliates or al qaeda themselves involved engaged in the attack? >> very soon in the early hours of the activity. >> was it a video? >> no, sir. >> did it spark a protest? >> no, sir. >> i want to get the facts at a time. the cia station chief is quoted as saying, "not not an escalation a protest." would you agree or disagree with the cia station chief's
CSPAN
May 1, 2014 10:00am EDT
, kuwait, israel, germany, and all across the globe. andificatioand, of course, theyd generations of men and women, the greatest generation, of which my dad was a member, the world war ii generation, and then of course those who fought in korea and vietnam and, of course, the most recent conflicts we've had, which i just mentioned in iraq and afghanistan. my strong conviction is that we owe a moral obligation -- not just a legal obligation -- to those veterans to keep our commitments to them once they separate from military service. and i'm sorry to say that the department of veterans affairs has repeatedly and outrageously failed to hold its own commitment to america's armed forces and our veterans. now, we're -- i think the problem, the way i see it, is we've almost become desensitized to the problem, because we know -- we all know that as a result of the drawdown of our military after our exit from iraq and now afghanistan that we're getting a large number of people rye tiring from military -- retiring from military service and so it's understandable that there would be more press
CSPAN
May 1, 2014 1:00am EDT
transit, germany, ukraine or other e.u. countries, they cooperate dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do, the minute the gas comes into the e.u., it is now e.u. gas and can be transferred further. when we talked earlier about reversing the flows into ukraine, that would not have been possible in 2009 because of the regulatory structure that was in place. so by working with them to get the regulatory structure there, they are less relipet today. but as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe, there is more we can do together to make sure that reliance is diminished, and quite significantly. >> forgive the pun, but? is it a pipe dream for americans to see themselves in anything like the near future providing natural gas to europe, and would that have any effect on our domestic market? or do we have so much that it would simply mean a new market and a new perhaps reduction in the trade imbalance if we were able to do that. >> i think the united states has a role to play and that our exports are an important factor. >> we a
CSPAN
Apr 30, 2014 9:00pm EDT
russia exports gas into the eu, the first country of transit, let's say germany or ukraine or other eu countries could not -- they could not dictate you may not pass this on without my permission to another country. what it allowed it to do is a minute a gas comes and it is eu gas and can be transferred further. we talked about reversing the flows from poland to hungary from slovakia into ukraine. that would not have been possible in 2000 nine because of the regulatory structure that was in place. i working with europe to get the regulatory structure there, making some investments and getting them to make investments in infrastructure, they are less reliant today. as russia will continue to be a supplier into europe emma there is more we can do together to make sure that that reliance is diminished and quite significantly. fors it a pipe dream americans who see themselves in anything like the near future europeng natural gas to and would that have any effect on our domestic market or do we have so much that it would ,imply mean a new market trades reduction in the investments if we
CSPAN
Apr 30, 2014 3:00am EDT
books and what things were like in germany before world world war with the sense of them being a rising power but with the grievance that they would soon be into position to correct in some way. now that doesn't mean conflict is inevitable but the decisions over the maritime disputes you felt the chance of to improve. >> the trip i took in march was my 9th trip there. and it was a great quote that i would like to point out from a debate from two people of letters. i will not go into their names. they were arguing about china and one was living there for a couple years and there other returned. and the guy who had not said the guy who lived there was too close to china and the guy responded surely there is a medium between never -- living in china versus never being there at all. that guy had never been there at all. i can tell you every time i go i learn how much i don't know and how much is changing in china. i would be concerned about china's economic rise if it doesn't happen. and that is because the imperative i think from the comm commonnist party is if they don't grow fast
CSPAN
Apr 28, 2014 12:00pm EDT
most. i kept thinking back to the history books and what things were like in germany before world war i. of germany being a rising power but with historical grievances that they would soon be in a position to correct in some way. that does not mean conflict is inevitable. the tensions over the various maritime disputes and the other you really felt the potential for increasing amounts of conflict. >> you have been following this for a long time, your thoughts? >> the trip i took in march was my night trip to china between the u.s. china working group. it was a great quote i like to point out from a debate that took place between two people of letters well known in the d c area. they were arguing about china, one had been living there for a couple years and returned and the other had not. the guy who had not said the guy who had been there was too close to china. and he could not be objective about his views and the guy responded by saying surely there is a happy medium between having lived in china and having never been there at all. that put the guy in his place, he had never bee
CSPAN
Apr 26, 2014 3:00am EDT
>> versai will les, by allowing kreup reparations against germany, the country that succeeded in being the guarantor of the global system after the war, underwriting the world bank, the integration.obal if you look at its distressing fatigue with the world, most demonstrate bid a to support aternational organizations, disstressing difficulty in consensus political for trade agreements that integration, a failure indo what's self evidently the interest of american workers support the xm banks, see, to,there for you, a failure a concern and a desire to ramp back military spending in a our potential adversaries military spending is rapidly. a reluctance to become embroiled in foreign challenges because they are too hard. ultimately, whether we will judged by history to have won the piece after the cold war, as we did after the second world war is in more today than would have seemed likely five or 10 years ago. the conventional security challenges, the conventional economic integration challenges that i've talked about. it's also the challenge of and globalic goods public bads. movi
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)